Andrea Crawford

WRITER AND JOURNALIST


In the Blog: The Original Creative Class

A regular job, that’s what I wanted when I was a child: a proper office, consistent hours, regularly appearing paychecks. I wanted to walk out of the house in heels and pantyhose and go off to work in a place that was not also my home. In short, I wanted the opposite of what I saw on the farm. I…


In the blog: French Revolution

Today I set out to storm the Bastille. Actually, I set out to find a food market in the neighborhood where the famous fort-turned-prison-turned-rallying-cry-for-freedom once stood. For me, traipsing alone through a city whose language I don’t speak and whose locals are not exactly known for their friendliness, the mission required a revolutionary zeal and courage of its own. As…


In the Blog: On Reading Food Labels

Everytime I visit Indiana and enter my mother’s kitchen I cannot stop myself. I do what I do everywhere: I read food labels. My goodness, what an act of transgression this is. Whenever she catches me peering into her pantry or refrigerator, the atmosphere sours, tensions heighten; sometimes she even walks away in a huff. And really, why shouldn’t she?…


On Television: The Year of the Farmer

On Super Bowl Sunday, Dodge debuted its ad “So God Made a Farmer” and ignited a debate over just who, exactly, the American farmer is today. A crackling recording of a speech by Paul Harvey offered an outdated description of grain farmers milking cows, weaning pigs, and birthing colts (outdated even when recorded three decades ago since most farmers stopped…


On Books: Reading Tamar Adler

It’s one thing for a vegetarian to go off the wagon on occasion. It’s another thing for a vegetarian to suddenly decide to cook a shoulder of beef. On Saturday, I did just that. I walked up to a stand at my farmer’s market that I had never before visited and bought the joint of a cow. And I was…


On Culture: Staten Island, Farm to City

"Farm to City," a phrase that began as shorthand for marketing methods, now also describes wholesale cultural transference, as urbanites keep chickens, butcher their own meat, can their own vegetables, and wear an overabundance of flannel and facial hair. The resonant title of the exhibition at the Museum of the City of New York—From Farm to City: Staten Island 1661–2012—actually…